Love is powerful
Love is powerful
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dogsandpupsdaily:

- Basenji. Want more? Follow:http://dogsandpupsdaily.tumblr.com/
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mashable:

"Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt."
[via]
mashable:

"Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt."
[via]
mashable:

"Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt."
[via]
mashable:

"Everything was beautiful and nothing hurt."
[via]
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instagram:

Portraying Pit Bulls with @sophiegamand

To see more flower-power pups, follow @sophiegamand on Instagram and check out some of Sophie’s favorite rescue accounts: @nyanimalrescue,  @secondchancerescuenyc, @animalhaven,  @tohanimalshelter.

New York photographer Sophie Gamand (@sophiegamand) first started the Pit Bull Flower Power series to show the breed in a new, softer light. She teamed up with several rescue groups to photograph pit bulls that were up for adoption with a new perspective to open hearts. Sophie creates headpieces for every photo shoot, patiently gluing fake flowers together in different shapes and sizes then matching the color and styles to the dog. “People are afraid of them, but the fact I was able to put flower crowns on their heads and photograph them like this says a lot about their temperament! They were all sweet and loving.”

When it comes to working with canine models, Sophie explains her process: “I make little noises behind the camera to catch their attention when I photograph the dogs, and very often they would come over to check on me and kiss me.”

On set, Sophie has a handler to help distract the dogs from the crowns delicately balanced on their heads.  She views the shoot as a mini-training session for the dogs. “Usually after the shoot they are ready to go to bed.”
instagram:

Portraying Pit Bulls with @sophiegamand

To see more flower-power pups, follow @sophiegamand on Instagram and check out some of Sophie’s favorite rescue accounts: @nyanimalrescue,  @secondchancerescuenyc, @animalhaven,  @tohanimalshelter.

New York photographer Sophie Gamand (@sophiegamand) first started the Pit Bull Flower Power series to show the breed in a new, softer light. She teamed up with several rescue groups to photograph pit bulls that were up for adoption with a new perspective to open hearts. Sophie creates headpieces for every photo shoot, patiently gluing fake flowers together in different shapes and sizes then matching the color and styles to the dog. “People are afraid of them, but the fact I was able to put flower crowns on their heads and photograph them like this says a lot about their temperament! They were all sweet and loving.”

When it comes to working with canine models, Sophie explains her process: “I make little noises behind the camera to catch their attention when I photograph the dogs, and very often they would come over to check on me and kiss me.”

On set, Sophie has a handler to help distract the dogs from the crowns delicately balanced on their heads.  She views the shoot as a mini-training session for the dogs. “Usually after the shoot they are ready to go to bed.”
instagram:

Portraying Pit Bulls with @sophiegamand

To see more flower-power pups, follow @sophiegamand on Instagram and check out some of Sophie’s favorite rescue accounts: @nyanimalrescue,  @secondchancerescuenyc, @animalhaven,  @tohanimalshelter.

New York photographer Sophie Gamand (@sophiegamand) first started the Pit Bull Flower Power series to show the breed in a new, softer light. She teamed up with several rescue groups to photograph pit bulls that were up for adoption with a new perspective to open hearts. Sophie creates headpieces for every photo shoot, patiently gluing fake flowers together in different shapes and sizes then matching the color and styles to the dog. “People are afraid of them, but the fact I was able to put flower crowns on their heads and photograph them like this says a lot about their temperament! They were all sweet and loving.”

When it comes to working with canine models, Sophie explains her process: “I make little noises behind the camera to catch their attention when I photograph the dogs, and very often they would come over to check on me and kiss me.”

On set, Sophie has a handler to help distract the dogs from the crowns delicately balanced on their heads.  She views the shoot as a mini-training session for the dogs. “Usually after the shoot they are ready to go to bed.”
instagram:

Portraying Pit Bulls with @sophiegamand

To see more flower-power pups, follow @sophiegamand on Instagram and check out some of Sophie’s favorite rescue accounts: @nyanimalrescue,  @secondchancerescuenyc, @animalhaven,  @tohanimalshelter.

New York photographer Sophie Gamand (@sophiegamand) first started the Pit Bull Flower Power series to show the breed in a new, softer light. She teamed up with several rescue groups to photograph pit bulls that were up for adoption with a new perspective to open hearts. Sophie creates headpieces for every photo shoot, patiently gluing fake flowers together in different shapes and sizes then matching the color and styles to the dog. “People are afraid of them, but the fact I was able to put flower crowns on their heads and photograph them like this says a lot about their temperament! They were all sweet and loving.”

When it comes to working with canine models, Sophie explains her process: “I make little noises behind the camera to catch their attention when I photograph the dogs, and very often they would come over to check on me and kiss me.”

On set, Sophie has a handler to help distract the dogs from the crowns delicately balanced on their heads.  She views the shoot as a mini-training session for the dogs. “Usually after the shoot they are ready to go to bed.”
instagram:

Portraying Pit Bulls with @sophiegamand

To see more flower-power pups, follow @sophiegamand on Instagram and check out some of Sophie’s favorite rescue accounts: @nyanimalrescue,  @secondchancerescuenyc, @animalhaven,  @tohanimalshelter.

New York photographer Sophie Gamand (@sophiegamand) first started the Pit Bull Flower Power series to show the breed in a new, softer light. She teamed up with several rescue groups to photograph pit bulls that were up for adoption with a new perspective to open hearts. Sophie creates headpieces for every photo shoot, patiently gluing fake flowers together in different shapes and sizes then matching the color and styles to the dog. “People are afraid of them, but the fact I was able to put flower crowns on their heads and photograph them like this says a lot about their temperament! They were all sweet and loving.”

When it comes to working with canine models, Sophie explains her process: “I make little noises behind the camera to catch their attention when I photograph the dogs, and very often they would come over to check on me and kiss me.”

On set, Sophie has a handler to help distract the dogs from the crowns delicately balanced on their heads.  She views the shoot as a mini-training session for the dogs. “Usually after the shoot they are ready to go to bed.”
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lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here
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lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here
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archiemcphee:

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.
Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.
[via Bored Panda]
archiemcphee:

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.
Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.
[via Bored Panda]
archiemcphee:

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.
Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.
[via Bored Panda]
archiemcphee:

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.
Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.
[via Bored Panda]
archiemcphee:

Toronto, Ontario-based artist Ruth Oosterman collaborates with her two-year-old daughter Eve to create imaginative paintings that feel as though they’ve been lifted from the pages of a fantastic series of storybooks we’re now dying to read. Here Oosterman describe their process:

As all of our collaborations start, my two year old creates her own sketch with an ink pen which I then use to turn into a watercolor painting. The sketch is completely her own with no instruction given from me, I simply use her creativity to inspire me to create a painting.

Oosterman says that she can usually either discern a picture hidden inside Eve’s sketch or her daughter will have chatted with her about what she was drawing. But sometimes there is no conteext andshe has to let her own imagination run with it.

I try to work quickly and let imagination and play take root into the painting rather than taking it to seriously, this way I can encourage Eve’s contribution without making it to “grownup.”

Visit Ruth Oosterman’s blog and her YouTube channel to check out more of her wonderful collaborations with young Eve.
Prints of some of their creations are available via the Eve’s Imagination Etsy shop.
[via Bored Panda]
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lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here
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kushandwizdom:

Words of Emotion
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kushandwizdom:

ThisLoveQuote
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kushandwizdom:

ThisLoveQuote
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lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here
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kushandwizdom:

ThisLoveQuote
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kushandwizdom:

ThisLoveQuote